Classic Car Club https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:45:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 27 Hours in a Volkswagen Syncro https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/27-hours-volkswagen-syncro/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/27-hours-volkswagen-syncro/#respond Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:45:55 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5663 Pat and Bob took a trip to Tampa to pick up the latest addition to the fleet.

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Pat and Bob took a trip to Tampa to pick up the latest addition to the fleet.

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Fall Track Day At Classic Car Club https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/fall-track-day-classic-car-club/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/fall-track-day-classic-car-club/#respond Wed, 25 Oct 2017 14:24:43 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5643 Classic Car Club visited its friends up to Monticello Motor Club to peel off laps in ///M Sport BMWs and...Read More →

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Classic Car Club visited its friends up to Monticello Motor Club to peel off laps in ///M Sport BMWs and race-ready Spec Miatas.  The best way to enjoy the club’s powerful fleet of cars is to increase one’s performance driving skills and there’s no more fun way to do that than to find the edges of your abilities on a fast track.   

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 8 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-8/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-8/#respond Wed, 04 Oct 2017 22:08:56 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5613 Track day number two on the RC390

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Track day number two on the RC390

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 7 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-7/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-7/#respond Fri, 22 Sep 2017 17:09:33 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5610 Prichinello goes on track with his new race whip. Corner workers be trappin’ for it.

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Prichinello goes on track with his new race whip. Corner workers be trappin’ for it.

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 6 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-6/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-6/#respond Thu, 31 Aug 2017 16:39:11 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5600 This was another rough one, but we take the good with the bad.  Last weekend, the weather report was rain...Read More →

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This was another rough one, but we take the good with the bad.  Last weekend, the weather report was rain for upstate, so I packed up the truck and headed to New York Safety Track in Jefferson NY again.  I wanted to get some wet riding laps in because riding in the rain is always great training.  It teaches you to be very gentle on the inputs, to treat the motorcycle, to hang off more to keep the motorcycle more upright on the fatter, safer part of the tire and it gets your synapses firing, as the feedback come in fast and forceful.

Personally, I find New York Safety Track to be one of the trickier places I ride.  It’s a great track that produces massive amounts of grip and an equal number of challenges.  A few of the corners are multi-radius so you really have to learn the correct line.  The track is situated on the top of a mountain.  When you get to a few corners, like turn 1 and 6, the outside of the corner starts to trail down the mountain, creating an extreme negative camber.  Entry into those corners needs to be slow and methodical so you can reach the first apex, get your direction, roll a little throttle and then tuck it back in for the second apex and corner exit.

The first session in the wet was fine. I warmed myself up and the trusted SV650 and started to pick up the pace.  Then the second session struck.  I threw down a sensible out lap to warm the tires, put in a second lap where I increased the speed a bit more and then went full throttle on lap three, which ended at turn one.  I was carrying too much speed through the braking zone.  I made it to the first apex in that corner fine, but was carrying too much corner speed to bring the bike back around to finish the bend.  This sent me wide and into that drop off negative camber.  I kept my radius and continued to trail on the brakes, but the wet tarmac made leaning more a bad option, so I rode off track just a touch and that’s all that was needed to crash.  There’s no run off there, so you’re immediately met with wet, rutted grass – sport bikes don’t like the grass so much and I binned it.  Complete operator error.

The good news is, like every other session and mile on the bike this year, I didn’t have a freakout.  Earlier in my riding career, that situation would have had me in full freakout mode, but that doesn’t happen to me anymore.  I could see what was happening, I did what I could to mitigate it and then accepted it when it was about to go down.   I was able to pick the bike up and ride it back to the pits.  There was no major damage, but the front wheel was about eight degrees left of center from the handlebars, due to the triple trees and forks twisting in the tubes. The tools I had with me weren’t the right ones to fix the front end, so I thought I drove all the way there, best to jump into another session and ride around the issue.  I found right corners very easy but the left ones were a huge fight.   In those conditions, I wouldn’t learn anything more and would most likely crash again, so I packed up the truck and headed home early.

The takeaway was to not let myself get sucked into the entry of the corner.  Something I’ve been taught many times, but still have a tendency to do.   Next up is Monday at New Jersey Motorsports Park….. and I’ll be on my new race bike.  More on that in the next post.

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 5 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-5/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-5/#respond Thu, 31 Aug 2017 16:37:42 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5598 If one is to be a great motorcycle rider, one must learn all the different styles.  I’ve been riding motocross...Read More →

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If one is to be a great motorcycle rider, one must learn all the different styles.  I’ve been riding motocross for the past two years to get more comfortable with low traction situations while on road tracks.  Motocross tracks typically offer all manner of traction conditions, from loose dirt, to hard-packed clay to deep sand and glorious, tacky mud.  The nature of riding MX is to control it with your legs and let the bike move around freely below you.

To brush up I headed to a new track called Gotham Mountain MX with friends Angelo, Corey and Kelli.  The temp was touching into 100 degrees but I put down about a dozen decent laps around the track.  Corey and Angelo don’t ride tracks.  They’re enduro riders – that’s when you ride offroad bikes through the trails.  Gotham mountain has 300 acres of trails, so I figured it was my time to practice the nuanced skill of enduro riding.   Enduro is all about reading the terrain, showing massive bike control at low speeds and skillfully traversing obstacles, like logs and boulders.  Oftentimes, the trail you’re rolling through is no wider than your handlebars, so squeezing through trees is part of the game.

On the flat stuff, I was actually pretty good.   I wheelied over concrete draining pipes that crossed our path, navigated the trail well and got over most obstacles on my first go.  Then came the downhills.  Part of the trail was on what felt like a 50 degree decline.  That downhill destroyed me.  I was trying to slow the bike with the rear brake to allow me to pick a direction and thread the needle, the whole time riding on slick stone surfaces and polished tree roots.  I crashed about 10 times.  It was grueling.  The thing is once you crash, the bike falls halfway down the mountain.  Then I had to chase it and try to lift it back up while still on the side of a decline and standing on the same shiny slabs of granite.  I left beaten, bruised and exhausted.   But I’ll do it again.  Angelo and Corey taught me a lot about weight distribution and body position at low speeds.  Phil Kavanagh – the founder of CCC has thousands of miles through Wales on his enduro and he also shared a great bit of advice – in enduro riding, especially downhill, don’t go slow – gas it, pick your line and hold on.  That sounds about right.

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 4 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-4/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-4/#respond Mon, 21 Aug 2017 19:24:28 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5590 The post MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 4 appeared first on Classic Car Club.

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Classic Car Club Summer Driving Tips https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/classic-car-club-summer-driving-tips/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/classic-car-club-summer-driving-tips/#respond Thu, 13 Jul 2017 18:38:05 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5540 This week, we shot of bottle rockets and the temp crossed north of 90 degrees, Fahrenheit. Summer is officially here....Read More →

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This week, we shot of bottle rockets and the temp crossed north of 90 degrees, Fahrenheit. Summer is officially here.  But just because it’s warm and beachy doesn’t mean that summer is a season without a few car concerns. At CCC Manhattan, we’ve been managing a fleet of vintage and persnickety cars for more than a decade, so we have a few summer motoring tips to share with you.


1 – Sunblock. In June it’s a chrome dome. In July and August, you’re looking at a full-blown red head if you don’t lather up in that convertible or spyder. Don’t forget that left arm too.  

 

2 – Somewhere on that instrumentation cluster is a temperature gauge. In most modern cars, we almost forget what we’re driving is still machinery, but the older cars will definitely let you know. Keep an eye on that temp gauge, especially on the hotter days and in stop and go traffic.  

 

3 – Speaking of hot temperatures, if you’re driving a classic, you might want to consider a bigger, more robust, aluminum radiator. If you can move more coolant, you can cool more things. While you’re under the hood, it’s also best to check the coolant system hoses for leaks and breaches.  

 

4 – Of course things are slippery in the winter, but did you know the roads lose traction in the hot summer heat too? Think of all those other poorly maintained cars around you. They’re belching slick coolant, oil is pushing past hot gaskets and the road below is soaking it up. When the heat rises, these oils and chemicals rise to the surface of the tarmac and things get greasy. Keep an eye out for the dark spots when driving.  

 

5 – Change that air filter. Over the colder months, leaves fall and cover our cars, decompose and clog things up, like air filters, drainage points, etc. Clean the leaves, and check all the filters.  

 

6 – Tires.  Are you still rocking those winter tires? Or, did you use your summer tires all winter and wear them down? Make sure you’re on the right rubber and that there’s enough of it. Pressure is important too. The temps swing wildly from summer to winter, and with it, tire pressure swings too. Make sure you’re operating within the tire manufactures’ pressure suggestions.

 

7 – Vision quest.  Over the winter, our cars get grimy. Additionally, when the sun starts to blaze through your windshield, it chemically affects the dashboard, causing that material to release a bit of vapor, which winds up on your windshield as a haze. Make sure to give the inside of  your windows a good cleaning – you’ll be surprised how dirty they were.

 

8 – Timing. Remember that more people are driving on public roads in the summer, so traffic jams happen. Make sure to check your route out and leave early enough to avoid the traffic and keep your car from overheating  It’s better to get there early than it is to get there hot and on a flatbed.  

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 3 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-3/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-3/#respond Tue, 11 Jul 2017 13:50:58 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5534 The last session on track, last weekend at New Jersey Motorsports Park, that session was a good one.  The weather...Read More →

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The last session on track, last weekend at New Jersey Motorsports Park, that session was a good one.  The weather was rain in the morning, as most of this season has gone so far, and blazing sun early morning onward.  

 

Preparation.  

Speed and clean lines on track start way before you unload the truck.  My workout regimen has me in the best shape I’ve ever been in as an adult.  I’m down to 153 pounds and I was feeling great.  No extra weight on me and no gut or flab bouncing around when I run up the stairs had me feeling invincible.  Then Classic Car Club’s Alps To Italy Rally hit the calendar.  I had no gym sessions and a lot of pasta for a week.  What’s more is my in-house training partner, Phelim Kavanagh, son of CCC founder Phil, was in from London for three months.  He called my guest room home and I called him my spotter.  We hit the gym together four to five times a week and pushed each other hard.  Now that his visa expired, I have this pasta to burn off on my own.  It’s going, but it could go quicker.  

The good news is Classic Car Club’s cycling club is in action.  Riding a bike is an excellent way to have a low-impact, high-energy work out.  The club moves quick though, so I need to train more on the bike just to hang in the pack during our Tuesday morning rides.  For me, I will get the most of my workout if I’m enjoying it.  Cycling is a good way for me to enjoy the torture.  

 

On Track.  

Thunderbolt.  My favorite track.  Partially because I know it well, but more so because it has a bit of everything.   Tight, left hand corners are followed by long, bending fast right handers.  There’s a great flow, a lot of technical bits and a lot of sections where you’re flat out and climbing though the entire gear set.  

Like every track outing, I study the track map and give myself two goals to work on.  At Thunderbolt, turn 3b (running the chicane) and turn 10 prove to be the most important to master.  From my last journal entry, you’ll know those are the most important because you’re on the throttle for long stretches after corner exit.  Getting out of the corner quick pays dividends on your lap time.  My goals were to correct my mistakes on my last outing.  That mistake was to approach riding too mechanically.  I was doing everything that needed to be done, such as weighting the outside peg when cornering, getting my head inside the radius, rolling throttle on smooth and then fast, but it was clunky.  While trying to learn my way around a new track, I didn’t let anything flow.  I was displaying a sequence of tactics and steps, but not tying them together nicely.  This time, my goal was to put the thinking aside and connect the things that have become reflexive in my riding and just connect the dots.  Think less.  Do more.  

Luckily, thinking less is something I do well.   Our first early morning session sported cold wind and a wet track.  Turn one and turn 10, the two most important, had a small river running across them, so I had to remember to take it a bit easy through those corners and stand the motorcycle up when running through them to eliminate lean angle, which is dangerous in the wet.  

At 8am, I rolled onto pit row, let the bike warm and went through my ritual of snapping my visor down, and saying in my helmet, “Where am I and what am I doing?  I’m at NJMP and I’m riding a motorcycle at speed because I’m a bad mother%&*er”.  It helps set my mind and put everything else in the background.  

The first wet cold sessions were fine.  I reminded myself of braking points, got up to speed and got the synapses in my mind firing.  By 11am, the sun came out blazing and the track dried quickly.  By 11:45 it was 97 degrees out and track temperature was closer to 125 Fahrenheit.  Too hot to be in head to toe leather, but just right to work the hell out of a set of Michelin Power One race tires.  With confidence in my rubber and a good tempo happening, I started twisting the throttle open earlier and with more authority.  

The rest of the day was perfect.  I got into a rhythm.  I was trail breaking into corners nicely and getting on the throttle early, the second I had direction.  As the day went on, the pace kept dropping.  I was above board on my goal of smoothing things out.  I’d dive into the corner and set my radius early.  If I had to adjust my line, I would do so by either opening or closing the throttle a degree or two or by just tipping my big heavy head into the center of the corner another few millimeter.   My faith in the tires grew and with it, lean angles.  I was dragging my knee through turns 1, 4, 5, 7 and 10.  This let’s me know I’m digging, getting to the limits of my machine.

When yellow or red flags didn’t fly, I was able to string together consistent laps, including a string of them in the 1:27s.  For me, this is competitive enough to race.  Remember, I wanted to be fast enough and also be in enough control to race in close quarters with other riders.  I’m there, but more on that in a bit.  

Since I finished my homework and ticked the goal box, I started working on extracurricular activity – backing the bike in.   “Backing it in” is when the rider trails the clutch into a corner at the same time as he or she trails in the brakes.  If you can get the rear wheel to spin a bit slower than the front tire by using engine braking, the rear will step out.  Once it’s out, you have to smoothly transition onto the throttle to keep it spinning and not let it hook up or get traction just yet.  Doing so would send you over the bars.  When you get it right, it allows you to get your direction earlier.  By backing it into the corner, you’re rounding the corner, but drifting the rear to get the front in the right direction.  That lets the rider get on the throttle before the apex of the corner, giving a few feet more of throttle time.   If dragging a knee is better than sex, then backing it in is better than sex on your own jet.  

A look at the tires shows the patterns of some slide and full use of the rear tire.  The front tire shows hard use too, but there’s an eighth of an inch band of unused rubber on the edges of the front, where the rear is completely consumed.  This means either I’m running too much tire pressure or riding like a wimp.  I’m not sure yet but I’ll share the verdict.  

Now that I’m feeling quick again and in total control, I’m entering the danger zone.  Confidence can’t get too high just yet.  That’s how mistakes are made.  Also, my goal for the next session is to keep the fluidity I’ve developed and now increase time on wide open throttle.  That means I have to brake a little later, and get on the gas a little earlier.  I’m playing with the dark, dirty edges of speed now.  This is when you make a small mistake and things go poorly.

And back to racing.  I have to decide what class is best and build a bike for it.  So far, I’m leaning in two directions.  The first is to stay in CCS Superlight Twins, a class my fantastic SV650 is made for, but I have to revert back to stock forks up front and ditch the Suzuki GSX-R inverted forks with Öhlins Suspension cartridges that give pretty good feel.  The second choice is to go for a smaller bike with massive corner speed – the KTM 390 R Cup Racer.  It’s a lightweight brawler and there are a number of cup series that I can race it in.  I just hate to crash something so beautiful.  

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MICHAEL’S RACE JOURNAL – ENTRY 2 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-2/ https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/michaels-race-journal-entry-2/#respond Tue, 27 Jun 2017 23:02:28 +0000 https://classiccarclubmanhattan.com/?p=5517 I was back on track this weekend.  This time, I motored up to New York Safety Track, a three- hour...Read More →

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I was back on track this weekend.  This time, I motored up to New York Safety Track, a three- hour trek up the Throughway, in Harpersfield New York.  


Like every track session, I approached this one with two goals.  The first is to work on my downshifting into the corner, trying to keep the motorcycle smooth and docile on corner entry, and my second goal was to continue to work on body positioning on corner exit.  Like a car, a motorcycle can only accelerate, brake and turn/lean.  It can only do 100 points of anything, meaning, if I’m using 50% of its ability to brake before a corner, I can’t ask it to use 75% of its ability to lean into a corner as well.  Doing so will send me into low altitude orbit.  So when exiting a corner, you want to add throttle.  To add throttle, you must stand the bike up more and reduce lean angle.  You reduce lean angle by hanging further off the motorcycle, placing your body weight on the inside of the corner.  It’s a fluid motion between (wo)man and machine.  It’s difficult to get correct, but when you do, man is it sweet.  

 

While that’s a simple enough itinerary for the day, things get complicated when it’s your first time at a track, no less a sprawling one like NYST.  To prepare, I watched a bunch of YouTube videos to see direction and elevation changes and to get a sense of when to turn left.  I also studied the track map.  This is important because at more than 2 miles long with 18 corners, I’m not going to master it first time out.  The best thing for a racer to do is to decide which are the most important corners.  Important corners are ones that are followed by a long segment of distance that you can hold the throttle wide open.  If a corner is followed by a short straight, the profit from a correct corner exit is minimal, but a long straight can save seconds.  Exiting an important corner 1 mile an hour faster can multiply to 10 mph a the end of the straight.  That’s how races are won.  For NYST, I identified turn six on the back half of the track and the last corner, 18 which brings you onto the front straight to be the crucial corners to focus on.  

 

It was raining for the first session and I felt my way around, deciding where the apexes were and what the fast line would be.  The riders around me were all over the map, so I decided its best to find my own line.  At the same time, I was working on my body positioning and downshifting.  As the day went on, the sun broke through, and so did my frustration.  I wasn’t riding to the level I wanted to.  I had more speed in me, it just wasn’t translating to the tarmac.  You can see what I mean in the video.  In between sessions, I studied the map, did laps in my head, and then would go back out and frustrate myself further.  

At lunch, I figured the best way to get over the hurdle was to get some advice, so I rode around the paddock to sniff out Greg, a great guy who owns NYST and has more laps around it than anyone.   I told him the goals I was working on for the day and my need to figure out the line through the track’s tricky multi-radius corners.  Greg and I spun a few laps together.  I tailed him for three laps to see where his line was, and then he followed me for a few laps to put an eye on my riding, to see if I was working towards my game plan.  

Greg’s report was helpful.  He said I was trying too hard.  He was right.  From behind, he could see me adding throttle, brake or body position inputs to get around the corners I was still learning.  I was trying to be a perfectionist, but that never works.  I was too hard on the brakes.  I was too hard on the throttle.  I was too hard on the bike.  Greg said, just do what you do.  Turn into the corner and keep that radius.  Don’t adjust it, smooth it out.  Racing, as I’ve said before, is 80% between the ears.  You need a clear, uncluttered mind to find the focus needed to guide a motorcycle through the corners at speed.  I headed back to the CCC tent in the paddock, put the bike on its stands and cleared my head, waiting for the next session.   When my time came around, I went through my little on track ritual, saying to myself in my helmet “where are you?  What are you doing?  I’m riding a motorcycle at NYST and I’m a bad son of a bitch.”  It helps.  I then snapped my visor down, cleared my head and let my reflexes take over.  I stuck to one radius, only adjusting it as needed by either slightly opening or closing the throttle by a degree or two and dipping my big, heavy head into the corner to adjust my trajectory.  


Three more sessions were left and I got faster, smoother and more focused.  If I went off line, I picked it up on the next corner.  I knocked about three seconds off my lap time which was great progress.  I left feeling confident that at the end of it all, my shifting and body position on corner exit improved.   Job done.

This Friday, I’ll be at New Jersey Motorsports Park, turning laps with coach Bill Sink of EvolveGT.  He’s a talented instructor that I’ve worked with before and with him I’ll be working on getting the bike deeper into the corner with more exaggerated lean angle.  The more I can lean it, the faster corner speed I can carry.  I’m also back at the gym hitting it hard.  After a week of rallying through the Alps and Italy with fellow CCC members, the pasta left its mark, so it’s time to knuckle down and lose that weight.  I rode our first outing with the CCC Cycling Club today before work.  Thanks to Ben Orisich, Vesko and the rest of the guys that pushed me to pedal today.   


Stay tuned for an update on Friday’s track session.  

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